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inthebox30lbs

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9 minutes ago, inthebox30lbs said:

Opinions for start and finish time at Chilhowee tournament April 27, 7 am-3pm????  8-4 ???

 

The sun rises at 6:47 a.m. that day. It would be a good idea to start early, say, 6:30 a.m. or 7 a.m. at latest. Being a Saturday, there could be jet skis or even skiers by late morning. 3 or 4 p.m. make good quit times. Between 7 a.m. and 3 p.m. there's both a Major and Minor Solunar feeding period.

 

Chilhowee Lake is a very small lake, just a bit over 1000 acres. I hope that the weather isn't too inviting for pleasure boats that day. It can get quite crowded on weekends.

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We are always in favor of early start and early finish. Like to have a chance at the low light bite before sun up.

 

After reading about Chilhowee, is that lake ready after being restocked last year?  That is not a lot of time for those stockers to get much pass 3# and while I have no idea what the survival rate is in that lake, I can't believe it is tremendously high.  Jocassee stocking has about a 5% survival rate 1 year after planting at 10".

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A ten pound rainbow was taken at the mouth of abrams creek recently according to troutgirl.  I took a 5 plus last summer.  There should be excellent numbers of 18-21” fish.  They grow fast in there with all the bait.  Even though the dam was drawn down the fish didn’t disappear it became more of a river with Calderwoods  ice cold discharge.  It’s unique fishery in that the constant  coldwater discharge doesn’t alow a thermocline to form.  You can take fish off the surface all year.  There will be a warm water layer and often 10’ down it’s in the fifties.  It’s one of my favorite reservoirs in NC or TN.  It’s 1734 acres according to wiki pedia. they stock around 25000  rainbows a year and lake trout as well.  There is a lack of predators in the lake compared to other reservoirs.  I’m sure Rachael will chime in she knows the lake better than anyone.   I really think most will enjoy it.  

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Thanks for the info Scott.  We will look forward to it.

 

Our recommendation for next year would be to include Jocassee into the rotation so we could have a "home game" too. That lake is a mountain lake too, but not as high.  I have only seen the temp below 50 one year since we started fishing there in 2010. You could have a tournament there from mid Dec-Feb. and have conditions better than Saturday.  There are cabins and campsites available on site and good size town about 20 minutes out.  Three ramps, large parking area, and tie up dock.

 

It is an easy pull from 40 to 26 to 25 and then 11.  About 1.5 hours from Asheville.  I have been working in Knoxville lately and it was 2-45 to my boat at the lake from the hotel which is the same distance I go to get there from Charlotte.

 

Not a lot of big fish but a very pretty lake that does give up an occasional trophy brown .  As you are only allowed 1 fish over 20"  (per person, not boat) our tournaments there are a 1 fish weigh-in.  

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The first thing I want to do is thank Scott for getting this together.  I enjoyed the opportunity.  Concerning the times for Chilowhee, I agree with mincmi, earlier the better.  I say that knowing I'll be camping at Calderwood that Friday night, then driving over in the early morning.  If the number of boats stays static you could always plug in Calderwood if issues arise with other lake choices.  I knew going in my experience on the lakes chosen is limited, and I love a challenge. Heck, my son was mad we didn't bring in every strike, he is a competitor to say the least.  Wednesday we are fishing Chilowhee just to say we've been on the lake.  We'll likely try what we do on Cheoah and Calderwood and adjust from there.  Anything pertinent will be shared.

 

Shea

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1 minute ago, mincmi said:

Thanks for the info Scott.  We will look forward to it.

 

Our recommendation for next year would be to include Jocassee into the rotation so we could have a "home game" too. That lake is a mountain lake too, but not as high.  I have only seen the temp below 50 one year since we started fishing there in 2010. You could have a tournament there from mid Dec-Feb. and have conditions better than Saturday.  There are cabins and campsites available on site and good size town about 20 minutes out.  Three ramps, large parking area, and tie up dock.

 

It is an easy pull from 40 to 26 to 25 and then 11.  About 1.5 hours from Asheville.  I have been working in Knoxville lately and it was 2-45 to my boat at the lake from the hotel which is the same distance I go to get there from Charlotte.

 

Not a lot of big fish but a very pretty lake that does give up an occasional trophy brown .  As you are only allowed 1 fish over 20"  (per person, not boat) our tournaments there are a 1 fish weigh-in.  

I agree I would love to fish that lake.  

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2 minutes ago, mincmi said:

Thanks for the info Scott.  We will look forward to it.

 

Our recommendation for next year would be to include Jocassee into the rotation so we could have a "home game" too. That lake is a mountain lake too, but not as high.  I have only seen the temp below 50 one year since we started fishing there in 2010. You could have a tournament there from mid Dec-Feb. and have conditions better than Saturday.  There are cabins and campsites available on site and good size town about 20 minutes out.  Three ramps, large parking area, and tie up dock.

 

It is an easy pull from 40 to 26 to 25 and then 11.  About 1.5 hours from Asheville.  I have been working in Knoxville lately and it was 2-45 to my boat at the lake from the hotel which is the same distance I go to get there from Charlotte.

 

Not a lot of big fish but a very pretty lake that does give up an occasional trophy brown .  As you are only allowed 1 fish over 20"  (per person, not boat) our tournaments there are a 1 fish weigh-in.  

Judging by the consistent size of fish you weighed in your experience gives you a 'home field advantage' anywhere you put that big Lund in the water.

 

Shea

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2 minutes ago, morewood said:

Judging by the consistent size of fish you weighed in your experience gives you a 'home field advantage' anywhere you put that big Lund in the water.

 

Shea

Thanks for the vote of confidence Shea, but we can strike out some too.  

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2 hours ago, mincmi said:

We are always in favor of early start and early finish. Like to have a chance at the low light bite before sun up.

 

After reading about Chilhowee, is that lake ready after being restocked last year?  That is not a lot of time for those stockers to get much pass 3# and while I have no idea what the survival rate is in that lake, I can't believe it is tremendously high.  Jocassee stocking has about a 5% survival rate 1 year after planting at 10".

 

I suspect that Chilhowee has a higher survival rate compared to most trout lakes. It's probably really high presently since there's fewer big Bass than before the draw-down. Also, there's probably no Lakers or if there are, they're juveniles. The explosion in the Yellow Perch population suggests this. Nobody knows how many of Chilhowee's Rainbows came back from Tellico Lake or how many of Tellico's Rainbows entered Chilhowee before the gates were shut back a little over two years ago. There are some bigger trout prowling around. My brother's husky Brown last year may have come from Citico Creek or Tellico River via Tellico....??? Who knows....? When the gates were open some of Tellico's Walleyes entered Chilhowee and maybe some of Chilhowee's Walleyes came back....??? Smallmouths, Walleyes, and Rainbows like to roam. It's impossible to know how many came back before the gates were closed. The guy who caught the 10 pound Rainbow was a Bass fisherman and he let it go.

 

There's lots of hiding spots for small trout at Chilhowee's top end and plenty of nymphs for them to eat there. When they hit about 13-14 inches, they move down into the lower lake and start chasing bait. Chilhowee seems well on the way to healing as far as the Rainbows go. They have less competition for the time being. I believe that Rainbows grow faster in Chilhowee than any other trout lake in Tennessee. They're heavier per inch than the other trout lakes I've fished in NC and TN. I think they grow about 1.5 - 2 inches per month.

 

Chilhowee is on the road to recovery......

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2 hours ago, inthebox30lbs said:

A ten pound rainbow was taken at the mouth of abrams creek recently according to troutgirl.  I took a 5 plus last summer.  There should be excellent numbers of 18-21” fish.  They grow fast in there with all the bait.  Even though the dam was drawn down the fish didn’t disappear it became more of a river with Calderwoods  ice cold discharge.  It’s unique fishery in that the constant  coldwater discharge doesn’t alow a thermocline to form.  You can take fish off the surface all year.  There will be a warm water layer and often 10’ down it’s in the fifties.  It’s one of my favorite reservoirs in NC or TN.  It’s 1734 acres according to wiki pedia. they stock around 25000  rainbows a year and lake trout as well.  There is a lack of predators in the lake compared to other reservoirs.  I’m sure Rachael will chime in she knows the lake better than anyone.   I really think most will enjoy it.  

 

Chilhowee is 1700 acres. It's Calderwood that's about 1000 acres. Be careful about scheduling a derby at Calderwood. It can't be on one of the weekends that Brookfield releases extra  water into the  Cheoah River. On those weekends, there's no room to park or camp at the Calderwood Ramp. It's over-run with river runners.

 

Chilhowee Lake is about 9 miles long. I'd say about 7.5 miles are trollable and over 25 feet deep. It's about 60-65 feet deep right at the dam. It takes a drought for it to be 10 feet down to the cold, 50-somethin' degree water. It's usually about 4-5 feet of warm water on top of the cold core in the lower lake in the summer. Rainbow jump more at Chilhowee than the other trout lakes.

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People skiing on chilhowee in April better have a wetsuit! I’ve never seen many pleasure boats there. The only time I have any trouble is people swimming on the boat ramp that won’t move . And that’s July/August 

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14 hours ago, morewood said:

The first thing I want to do is thank Scott for getting this together.  I enjoyed the opportunity.  Concerning the times for Chilowhee, I agree with mincmi, earlier the better.  I say that knowing I'll be camping at Calderwood that Friday night, then driving over in the early morning.  If the number of boats stays static you could always plug in Calderwood if issues arise with other lake choices.  I knew going in my experience on the lakes chosen is limited, and I love a challenge. Heck, my son was mad we didn't bring in every strike, he is a competitor to say the least.  Wednesday we are fishing Chilowhee just to say we've been on the lake.  We'll likely try what we do on Cheoah and Calderwood and adjust from there.  Anything pertinent will be shared.

 

Shea

 

I just checked Brookfield's Smoky Mountain Hydro site. 27 & 28 April are Cheoah River release days. The Calderwood ramp and camping spaces will get over-run. You might have trouble even parking when you got back from Chilhowee....? There's campsites on Chilhowee next to the dam on the south, Monroe County, side of the lake. There's a small ramp there. The north side of the lake where U.S. 129 runs is in Blount County. I'm not sure how to get there but it would involve  going south of the Tellico Lake Bridge on U.S. 411.  You can camp at spots along the lake but only on the south side. There's a cove straight across from the main ramp where folks camp.

Edited by Troutgirl

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4 hours ago, Troutgirl said:

 

I just checked Brookfield's Smoky Mountain Hydro site. 27 & 28 April are Cheoah River release days. The Calderwood ramp and camping spaces will get over-run. You might have trouble even parking when you got back from Chilhowee....? There's campsites on Chilhowee next to the dam on the south, Monroe County, side of the lake. There's a small ramp there. The north side of the lake where U.S. 129 runs is in Blount County. I'm not sure how to get there but it would involve  going south of the Tellico Lake Bridge on U.S. 411.  You can camp at spots along the lake but only on the south side. There's a cove straight across from the main ramp where folks camp.

I hadn't checked release dates yet, they are heavy in the spring though.  I'll be in my slide-in camper, wouldn't be coming back.  I'll find somewhere to park my circus for the night.  Going tomorrow, any areas I need to know about for navigation.  Obviously it's shallow up high, but any obstructions down the lake would be nice to know about.

 

Shea 

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1 hour ago, morewood said:

I hadn't checked release dates yet, they are heavy in the spring though.  I'll be in my slide-in camper, wouldn't be coming back.  I'll find somewhere to park my circus for the night.  Going tomorrow, any areas I need to know about for navigation.  Obviously it's shallow up high, but any obstructions down the lake would be nice to know about.

 

Shea 

 

When you go around the first bend downstream of the ramp, the creek on the right is Slickrock Creek. That's where you enter Tennessee. There was once a logging railroad that crossed the river there and ran along that north side bank. Brookfield's site says the lake is 5+ feet below full today. For about the first 1.5 miles downstream from Slickrock Creek there are some really shallow spots on the right that were the railroad bed once was. With the water as low as it is today, you might be able to see the top of a railroad tunnel in that area. We used to see it routinely when they used to lower the lake for the winter. I forget where it is precisely. Stay in the center and you'll be OK. Keep any deep lines away from the banks....divers or leadcore lines. Even when it's deep there is so very much downed timber below the surface. I've snagged up leadcore lines many times in downed timber.

 

Down near the dam it is fairly shallow on the right. There's a ledge down there about 10-15 feet down that was once a construction road or platform, I believe. This area would start a little bit upstream from the Portage Dock and go downstream to the dam. Just stay out in the center and you should be fine. Still, the steep canyon walls funnel every downed tree down. down, down. They can turn up in spots that seem plenty deep. Downstream from the portage dock there's a white, PVC pipe that sticks out of the bank. Tennessee stocks fish through it. I've never been there when they were doing so.....

 

If you want a better shot at the wary Browns, troll with your electric motor if it's calm enough to do so, especially down near the dam. The biggest Brown I've landed was 5 pounds but I lost one about twice that size about 6 years ago about 1.5 miles above the dam. It hit a Countdown Rapala on a leadcore line. I got it within about 15 yards of the boat and it came to surface and looked at me and bolted for the bottom and the hook pulled out, ouch! The lake's baitfish run small and small lures will out fish bigger ones most of the time.

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3 hours ago, Troutgirl said:

 

When you go around the first bend downstream of the ramp, the creek on the right is Slickrock Creek. That's where you enter Tennessee. There was once a logging railroad that crossed the river there and ran along that north side bank. Brookfield's site says the lake is 5+ feet below full today. For about the first 1.5 miles downstream from Slickrock Creek there are some really shallow spots on the right that were the railroad bed once was. With the water as low as it is today, you might be able to see the top of a railroad tunnel in that area. We used to see it routinely when they used to lower the lake for the winter. I forget where it is precisely. Stay in the center and you'll be OK. Keep any deep lines away from the banks....divers or leadcore lines. Even when it's deep there is so very much downed timber below the surface. I've snagged up leadcore lines many times in downed timber.

 

Down near the dam it is fairly shallow on the right. There's a ledge down there about 10-15 feet down that was once a construction road or platform, I believe. This area would start a little bit upstream from the Portage Dock and go downstream to the dam. Just stay out in the center and you should be fine. Still, the steep canyon walls funnel every downed tree down. down, down. They can turn up in spots that seem plenty deep. Downstream from the portage dock there's a white, PVC pipe that sticks out of the bank. Tennessee stocks fish through it. I've never been there when they were doing so.....

 

If you want a better shot at the wary Browns, troll with your electric motor if it's calm enough to do so, especially down near the dam. The biggest Brown I've landed was 5 pounds but I lost one about twice that size about 6 years ago about 1.5 miles above the dam. It hit a Countdown Rapala on a leadcore line. I got it within about 15 yards of the boat and it came to surface and looked at me and bolted for the bottom and the hook pulled out, ouch! The lake's baitfish run small and small lures will out fish bigger ones most of the time.

 

My goof, I meant Chilowhee.  We fish Calderwood more than any where else.  My son asked if the information you have was up to snuff, I told him it was.  As far as the tunnel, halfway down the  first long straight on the right (north) side.  The back side looks like a trout haven but tons of debris make it a nightmare.  The bigger ones I've caught generally come from the current up above the dock and below the bridge.

 

Shea

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Chilhowee trolls good all the way up to Tabcat Creek. That's the little creek that comes in right where U.S. 129 heads up the mountain. I usually turn back downstream there. It's good trolling all the way down to the dam especially in the spring. The fish will be spread out now, probably. From the main ramp up to Tabcat Creek is more productive in the afternoons than down lake when the lake is thick with baitfish. A mixture of Smallmouths and Rainbows will attack the bait and drive the bait into the current. The bait may not be so thick just yet. Right now, early, wiggle hoochies usually catch more fish than plugs. Keep the plugs small. I like 1.5 - 2 inch shad plugs that run 4 - 8 feet. I would not fish spoons deeper than 20 feet. 10 -15 feet is probably deep enough. If you use Dipsy Divers, you only need the Mini size.

 

Chilhowee is shallow and well illuminated because light bounces off the bottom. The water is usually V-E-R-Y clear unless the creeks are running like gangbusters and muddy. You may get more strikes if you use lighter line than most other lakes. I never use higher than 10 pound flouro and always have a couple of lighter lines out.

 

The fish feed off the bottom in Chilhowee way more than the deeper lakes. The Rainbows and the Smallmouths eat nymphs and crawdads off the bottom when they're not chasing minnows. I think they take hoochies to be emerging insects....? Little orange and green crawdad plugs  fish good many days.

 

By the time that the Trout Derby comes around the Trout should be less sluggish than presently. The middle of the lake, 2 miles up or downstream of the Abrams Creek Bridge is usually prime. If the current is slower, maybe a little more upstream. If the current is heavy right out from the main ramp, just downstream from Abrams a piece could be holding a lot of fish. I've seen heavy current,  9-10,000 CFPS push most the bait and fish downstream of the main ramp into a wide area that I call the Abrams "Sea".

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I would encourage folks that have never fished Chilhowee to go the Chilhowee Lake section and look at the pictures that myself and others posted of the draw-down. You'll see old bridges at Abrams Creek, now submerged and where the channel runs.

 

When I say that Chilhowee's Rainbows are thick, here's an example. Here's a 5.25 pound Rainbow. It was only 22" long. It liked a purple splatter hoochie. It bit the back hook off once I got it in the boat. This was my biggest Rainbow of the 2015 season. Both I and my buddy Captain D lost bigger Rainbows that summer and then the draw-down began in September.

 

I just added a bunch of my draw-down picture.......

5 pound Rainbow, Chilhowee Lake, 2 Wednesday, 2015 029.JPG

5 pound Rainbow, Chilhowee Lake, 2 Wednesday, 2015 032.JPG

Draw-down Chilhowee 16 Oct. 2015 038.JPG

Chilhowee Dam Repairs, 2 Feb.  2016 006.JPG

Chilhowee Dam Repairs, 2 Feb.  2016 004.JPG

Draw-down Chilhowee 16 Oct. 2015 002.JPG

Draw-down Chilhowee 16 Oct. 2015 026.JPG

Draw-down Chilhowee 16 Oct. 2015 054.JPG

Draw-down Chilhowee 16 Oct. 2015 051.JPG

Drwa-down Chilhowee 5 Oct. 2015 048.JPG

Drwa-down Chilhowee 5 Oct. 2015 019.JPG

DRAW-DOWN CHILHOWEE 2015 016.JPG

DRAW-DOWN CHILHOWEE 2015 018.JPG

DRAW-DOWN CHILHOWEE 2015 022.JPG

DRAW-DOWN CHILHOWEE 2015 035.JPG

Drwa-down Chilhowee 5 Oct. 2015 004.JPG

Drwa-down Chilhowee 5 Oct. 2015 009.JPG

Drwa-down Chilhowee 5 Oct. 2015 016.JPG

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If you drive past here towards Deals Gap, I have a US Census report from 1952 that has my Ol’ Man’s name on it. Their Address was Calderwood dam road, he was about12 years old. He told me once that the sunshine was piped in. I always feel like I’m home on Chilhowee. This one came off a home made spinner.

5E2A125F-DA03-48EE-BA8B-C17509F02AC7.jpeg

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1 hour ago, bigsmallie said:

Do you have to troll?

 

Yes! You can noodle 'em or shoot them with a speargun.... :wink:   ....well, you could cast one of those homemade spinners, that's just like trolling really slow.

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On 3/27/2019 at 1:58 AM, Troutgirl said:

Chilhowee trolls good all the way up to Tabcat Creek. That's the little creek that comes in right where U.S. 129 heads up the mountain. I usually turn back downstream there. It's good trolling all the way down to the dam especially in the spring. The fish will be spread out now, probably. From the main ramp up to Tabcat Creek is more productive in the afternoons than down lake when the lake is thick with baitfish. A mixture of Smallmouths and Rainbows will attack the bait and drive the bait into the current. The bait may not be so thick just yet. Right now, early, wiggle hoochies usually catch more fish than plugs. Keep the plugs small. I like 1.5 - 2 inch shad plugs that run 4 - 8 feet. I would not fish spoons deeper than 20 feet. 10 -15 feet is probably deep enough. If you use Dipsy Divers, you only need the Mini size.

 

Chilhowee is shallow and well illuminated because light bounces off the bottom. The water is usually V-E-R-Y clear unless the creeks are running like gangbusters and muddy. You may get more strikes if you use lighter line than most other lakes. I never use higher than 10 pound flouro and always have a couple of lighter lines out.

 

The fish feed off the bottom in Chilhowee way more than the deeper lakes. The Rainbows and the Smallmouths eat nymphs and crawdads off the bottom when they're not chasing minnows. I think they take hoochies to be emerging insects....? Little orange and green crawdad plugs  fish good many days.

 

By the time that the Trout Derby comes around the Trout should be less sluggish than presently. The middle of the lake, 2 miles up or downstream of the Abrams Creek Bridge is usually prime. If the current is slower, maybe a little more upstream. If the current is heavy right out from the main ramp, just downstream from Abrams a piece could be holding a lot of fish. I've seen heavy current,  9-10,000 CFPS push most the bait and fish downstream of the main ramp into a wide area that I call the Abrams "Sea".

Thanks for the information.  Yesterday was rough with the bright sun.  We ended up with 19 and only two were noteworthy, the others were stocker size.  I tried many items, but got zero hits on any of my standard size Michigan stinger spoons.  My scorpion size stingers did well as did my Carlson size 105 flutter spoons.  I even got one on a smaller shad rap behind a planner board.  I didn't get a strike below 20'.  Most fish were caught at the 10' level.  If anyone wants to see the aerial view of the draw down simply look at Google Earth/ maps terrain view.  That pic is from that time period and shows the channel and shoals very well.  Although we went up to the skinny water we didn't do much up there.  I'll add a pic of the larger two in a bit.

 

Shea

 

Edited by morewood

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Shea, I think that you're wasting your time pulling full-size Michigan Stingers. When there were Lakers in Chilhowee, I couldn't get them to hit them. About 6-7 years ago, I spent a whole summer pulling big spoons, mostly Stingers, around the lake on my first leadcore outfit. I never got a strike. When I put on smaller spoons I picked up Perch and Smallmouths. I was using 6 pound leaders. One day I trolled till dark with nary a strike. I anchored and put out my float light and decided to see if could pop a few Rainbows on crawlers. After about 10 minutes I got a massive strike. I thought I had a big 'Bow. The fish wanted to stay deep. The second time I got the fish up near the boat I could see the white, leading edges of the fins. It was a Laker. The fish took line and went back to the bottom again. I was using an ultralight spinning rod with 6 pound test, so, the drag was set rather loose. The third time I got the fish up, it was spent. I was fishing alone. If I'd had a buddy along I would of landed it. It was laying on it's side and just as I was lifting the net, the fish had one last head shake in it and that shook the hook....ugh! Now that I've caught some lakers, the lost one was about 6 pounds.

 

I never landed a Laker in Chilhowee. I'm relatively sure I had an even bigger one on another time. The fish hit a plug behind a Church Walleye Board. I had the fish on for about 10 minutes. The fish dove for the bottom. During my ten minute fight, the fish held my board under water almost the whole time. The board made one brief appearance on the surface for just seconds. The fish knocked the plug out in a weed bed. I figure it was a Laker that was 10 pounds or more. I never landed a single Laker in Chilhowee. I had to go to Watauga to finally land one.

 

There's people on this forum who doubted there were any Lakers in Chilhowee. When the sun angles were right, I could see them sitting below the Abrams Creek Bridge. They looked 20-35 inches long. I saw juvenile Lakers at the dock at the old ferry up near the Calderwood Powerhouse. Lakers could not have survived the draw-down. It was much too shallow and lethally warm for them come the spring and summer of '16 when the lake was all the way down. Once it was all the way down they opened the gates. If any of Chilhowee's Lakers survived they went to Tellico Lake. It's uncertain if any came back....???

 

Most of the folks that I talked to that caught Lakers in Chilhowee were Bass fishing and caught them on plugs. I talked to one guy that caught 2 four pound Lakers one night on a Zara Spook top water plug. Another fisherman told me couldn't get Laker strikes with line heavier than 4 pound.

 

Hoochies and plugs have out-fished spoons for me at Chilhowee.....and I don't think there's any substantial number of Browns in there. My brother got a nice Brown last year but I think it was a fluke. The only Browns ever stocked in Chilhowee were the Ohrid Lake Browns back in the early 80's. They didn't reproduce and disappeared. They didn't last in Watauga either.....

 

Scorpion Spoons ought to be the largest spoons you use....me thinks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Troutgirl

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6 hours ago, morewood said:

Thanks for the information.  Yesterday was rough with the bright sun.  We ended up with 19 and only two were noteworthy, the others were stocker size.  I tried many items, but got zero hits on any of my standard size Michigan stinger spoons.  My scorpion size stingers did well as did my Carlson size 105 flutter spoons.  I even got one on a smaller shad rap behind a planner board.  I didn't get a strike below 20'.  Most fish were caught at the 10' level.  If anyone wants to see the aerial view of the draw down simply look at Google Earth/ maps terrain view.  That pic is from that time period and shows the channel and shoals very well.  Although we went up to the skinny water we didn't do much up there.  I'll add a pic of the larger two in a bit.

 

Shea

 

Thanks for the post. Did you catch any bass? 

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