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CreekFreek

24 volt vs 12volt

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I've started looking for a trolling motor to replace my motor guide on my 98 G3. Since this is the first trolling motor I've bought I'm noticing more and more 24 volt motors out there. I just have a 12volt 43lb thrust on it now and it struggles to keep the thing against wind and current. I thought just going with a stronger thrust might be enough but thought the 24 might be overall better. What do ya'll think? 

 

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Edited by CreekFreek

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There are more perks to the 24 volt system besides being more thrust. They are also more efficient than a 12 volt system, they will use less battery power than a 12 volt motor would. I would highly recommend going 24 volt.

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If you can spare the room for the 3rd battery id say go for it. It's always better if you don't need to run it as hard.

Edited by HONDAM

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I'll bet, with your 12 volt, that you have never thought about the trolling motor throwing you out of the boat. 

A 24 volt can do just that if turned sideways.  There is that much difference.

The only drawback is another battery.  One time, I wired my 24 volt to use the crank battery for the second battery.  I don't recommend doing that. So, figure on adding another 100 bucks for a battery to the price of a 24 volt trolling motor.

I use mine all of the time but, I don't think that I would really miss it. If that makes sense.

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24 volt.

 

Size your batteries big enough to handle the increased thrust capabilities of your new motor.  Also, now is the perfect time to go over your trolling motor wiring to make sure its in good shape.  The whole system can only be as good as its weakest link.

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I had a motor guide 50lb or just  a touch over 50 on my boat. In heavy current or extremely strong wind it would not do the job sufficiently. It would do ok and I could live with it but when I had the chance to upgrade I went to a 70lb 24 volt system. I will not look back or go back to a 12 volt unless I have too. I never had a battery go dead on my 12 but it would be close after a long day of hard fishing, I could stretch 2 days if I didnt run it too hard. With this 24 volt I can fish hard all day int he current and run it on higher speeds and I have never drained it down past 1/2 way. I have a minn kota ipilot 70 and if the head is turned sideways and you accidentally hit that rabbit button you can get wet fast. I have almost been tossed out a time or two and have been thrown off balance a few times also. We fished hard all day this past saturday in strong winds and used the motor 90% of the day and it still was over 3/4 charged when we returned home. If you go with a wireless system watch out for that rabbit button it will get you. 

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My vote is as much voltage and thrust as you can afford.  If you can swing it, do the 24v.

 

My boat is really big and I have a 36v 101lb thrust RipTide on it.  Only thing is the weight of the batteries plus the charger, and loss of usable storage space.  Be careful of the rabbit button otherwise you can find yourself swimming.  In moderate river current, max speed will hold the boat in place.  In light current, we can go upstream. 

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My 36# Motor guide is 12 volt for my 14' fiberglass boat with a 28 ahp . It does O.K. , but If I run it on high (#5) for too long, it will burn the wires, forcing me to re-wire it. IF I ever buy another troller, it will be a 24 volt system with the digital control.   dada 2-9-15   10:37 PM

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