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Standup Kayak?

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Ok folks, I'm jumpin in wanting to hear from the experts.  I've been a loyal canoe fisher in the ET rivers for a long time and are considering a jump to a Kayak.  I am looking at the "standup" yaks - specifically the Fish Hawk with its "extentable" pontoons. 

 

http://freedomhawkkayaks.com/products.php

 

I am wondering if anyone on here has a Fish Hawk and if they are as good as they appear.  They appeal to me with the apparent stable platform with the pontoons extended but without a lot of added drag when paddling.  My question is are they durable?  I have looked at the setup that extends the outriggers and are concerned about how it holds up.  Any input on this or competitive kayaks is appreciated.

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It is made from the same plastic as other brands of kayaks.  I am unsure how sturdy the connection of the pontoons to the main body is or is not. Regardless, it is a wear point. My biggest concern would be the ability to paddle while standing up.  Especially in a river, I seldom get more than 5 or 6 cast in before having to make a correction stroke to reposition the kayak.  How difficult would it be to reposition with the pontoons deployed?  Also with them being spread out, how is current going to redirect your drift?   A test paddle would answer my concerns. 

 

If you are wanting a lean bar, I would look hard at the Jackson Big Rig.  If no lean bar is desired, and you fly fish, I would also look at the "canoe"ish kayaks like Jackson Kilroy, Native Ultimate, and Wilderness Systems Commander.  

 

Other standable kayaks are the Native Slayer, Jackson Cuda and Big Tuna, WS Ride 115 and 135.  But for river fishing (especially technical rivers) the Jackson Coosa shines (but it gets blown around by wind on larger rivers and lakes).  I think the best value in a standable kayak that works good on rivers right now is the Jackson Cruise.  

 

After being in a high low seat, I won't be going to sitting in low kayak seat again for fishing.  Besides a tall seat makes it much easier to stand (and a lot better to seat back down).

 

You really need to demo several models, you will then know what will work for you. 

 

There are also lots of paddle board options too. 

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I have a Cobra Fish 'n Dive that's stable enough to stand on for casting, but I mostly want to stand to throw a cast net, which is just too much weight shifting around to be stable.  But I've had worse epic fails trying to throw the cast net in a canoe!    It was ill advised, but I had to try :)

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I carry a bait tank and cast net on my Hobie. You guys should really look into one. They are expensive, but if you are going to be kayak fishing a lot it will pay off.

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imagejpg1_zpsd5eb44dd.jpg

 

The Hobie Outback is also a very stable choice and a lot easier to carry.

 

What sets Hobie apart is built in UV inhibitors, mirage drive, and pontoon shaped hull.

 

You won't find any fishing kayak as versatile and stable as Hobie Fishing kayaks.

Edited by C4PZL0K

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Not as nice as the Pro Anglers for sure but I'm a pretty big fella and can dance around in my NuCanoe Frontier 12.  It's not as pricey as the Hobies, but it sure gets the job done for me when I want to do some standing.  Like BFish said too ... I've heard some good things about the Big Rig , but the Coosa is not for me when I rode a couple of those ... guess I'm too big for them.

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I purchased a Freedom Hawk Freedom 12 a couple years ago and it was horrible. It paddles like a barge and don't even think about trying to paddle with the pontoons extended. I sold it to a guy I worked with and he hated it also. I would not waste your money on one. I have since purchased an inflatable NRS Gigbob and it was a great investment. It is frameless, so I can put it in the trunk of a car, yet it is stable enough to stand up and fish when inflated. You also sit very high above the water. Just remember, you get what you pay for with inflatables. I don't really get why people spend thousands on a kayak like a Hobie. They are so big and heavy that many people put them on a boat trailer and you can't carry them far to a good put in. You can get an all welded jon boat that will last your whole life for less than these kayaks cost.  If weight is an issue just get a riveted 12 or 14 ft jon boat and use a trolling motor.  It will be light enough to drag over shoals and you won't have to fight the wind and paddle constantly. I have a 12x36 riveted jon that I use with a trolling motor and I can easily stand and fish or throw a cast net. This is just my opinion. I have used everything from fishing kayaks, inflatables, riveted jons, and all welded jons. Unless you are going to be fishing in a river with some serous rapids, I would consider a lightweight jon or an inflatable.

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Back when I was 8 ft tall I stood up in a Kayak. The report said alcohol was involved but, that was a lie.

??? What. I just now chimed in. Alcohol?

 

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

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I've used standup yaks in FL.  The one I owned was a tri-hull and wide.  Very stable even in choppy water on the Gulf of Mexico

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Sorry Guys.

I am a True believer in Feelfree rather it's the Lure or Moken.

Been in about 15 different Yaks and studied for a while but can't move in any other direction other than Feelfree.

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